How Big is it Really?

Anice Barbosa

My non-KC friends have asked for a picture of my lens because I keep calling them “quarter-sized.” OK. They are not exactly quarter-sized.

To be precise, they are 20mm in diameter, 4mm shy of a quarter. How is my lens different from others?

20140517-220501.jpg

On my index finger is my scleral contact lens, on my middle finger is your average size lens. So, it is a lot bigger.

On the bottom you see how my lens sticks out. That’s because it’s made to fit the shape of my eye. It is made of a durable hard plastic. Almost glass-like. Soft lenses do not say in my eye. They fall right out.

To put it in, I fill up the contact with preservative free saline solution, hold both my upper and lower lid tight, push it in with a plunger and release. (Image below)

20140517-221608.jpg

To take it out, I use my lower…

View original post 132 more words

Advertisements

Computer Vision Syndrome

Eye care - Dubai

1 Working long hours in front of the computer has sadly become a big part of our lives, be it at work, while studying, and even when we just relaxing. The resulting effect of long hours of glare is Computer Vision Syndrome, a visual condition that we are all too familiar with. If you have never worn a pair of eye glasses, then your eyes are most susceptible to this eye disorder which can have squinting, and straining your eyes heavily.

If you notice that letters on the screen blurring out, fading into the background, or you find it hard to focus, then you will need to seek medical attention immediately to prevent your vision from depreciating further. One of the main causes that lead to the onset of computer vision is not seeking help for already existing visual difficulties. If you have avoided wearing glasses, or getting your vision checked…

View original post 373 more words

Trattamento di cheratocono con il metodo di Corneal crosslinking

Morela oculisti blog

Il cheratocono e’ una malattia degenerativa non immfiamatoria, piu’ comunemente si verifica in eta’ dai20 ai 40 anni. Il cheratocono ha una incidenza riferita alla popolazione generale attorno ad un caso per 2.000 abitanti, in Europa si ammalano di questa malattia circa 45000 pazienti all’anno. L’eziologia del cheratocono rimane ancora, a tutt’oggi, poco chiara, si presume che sia una malattia genetica. E’ notato che in alcuni casi possa giocare un ruolo anche l’azione meccanica dello strofinare gli occhi, come nel caso di forme allergiche.

Sintomi della malattia

Questa malattia e’ caratterizzata da un progressivo assottigliamento della cornea (la parte anteriore del bulbo oculare la cui proprieta’ principale e’ la trasparenza attraverso cui guardiamo) e a causa del- l’assottigliamento irregolare, la cornea sporge. La sporgenza della cornea come conseguenza ha il peggioramento della vista, qualche volta appare la doppia vista quando si guarda con un occhio, qualcuno avverte abbagliamenti e fastidio…

View original post 783 more words

Seeing is Believing

laurelannhardy

Image

My world was shattered two years ago when I found out I had Keratoconus. I rare eye disease that some how chose me as its victim. At first, that word was just a word I had to search for in the dictionary, but now it has consumed my whole life – and that word will always be a part of me.

For those two years, I tried to pretend like my life wasn’t ruined because I was unable to see out of one eye properly, but as each day concludes, and another one starts, I realize that my eye is making it impossible for me to continue with what I love to do … write.

I sometimes cry myself to sleep because the pain is too unbearable and tears seem to soothe my eyes – other times – I close my eyes because seeing is just to hard. But most…

View original post 112 more words

Vitamin B-based treatment for corneal disease may offer some patients a permanent solution

ClinicalNews.Org

Public release date: 24-Oct-2011

3-year outcomes of clinical trial of collagen crosslinking treatment for keratoconus highlighted at American Academy of Ophthalmology 2011 Annual Meeting

ORLANDO, Fla. – October 24, 2011 – Patients in the United States who have the cornea-damaging disease keratoconus may soon be able to benefit from a new treatment that is already proving effective in Europe and other parts of the world. The treatment, called collagen crosslinking, improved vision in almost 70 percent of patients treated for keratoconus in a recent three-year clinical trial in Milan, Italy. The treatment is in clinical trials in the United States and is likely to receive FDA approval in 2012. The results of the Milan study are being presented today at the 115th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology in Orlando, Florida.

View original post 414 more words

The differences between having some useful vision and not having any useful vision

Aniridia Network UK

Jenny By Jenny

Having already been severely sight impaired, I’ve recently lost a significant amount of vision.

There are things I can still do and some I almost took for granted that I cannot do now. There are other things I now find difficult that I have had to find new ways to make manageable again.

What I already used feel for instead of vision

  • Tying my shoelaces
  • Brushing my hair
  • Washing up
  • Identifying loose change

What I can still do

  • Brushing my teeth – although putting the toothpaste on the brush can be a very messy and fun experience!!
  • Shower and dress myself.
  • Identify clothes – although I do have two cardigans that are very similar and once thought I was wearing the white one until a friend commented I was looking pretty in green!!
  • Use my hob and oven – both are gas. I can tell which gas mark…

View original post 1,515 more words

Keratoconus – my story by Rhonda, USA

Rhonda’s story I'd like to share some of my recent events. I am from Massachusetts, USA. As a member of KeratoconusGB I have been posting my updates there, and now I am sharing my story with the wider world in the hope that it can helps fellow keratoconus folk.   If I had Keratoconus 25 years … Continue reading Keratoconus – my story by Rhonda, USA